Email Address
Add a valid email address
Get Email
Updates

Acoustic Dinner Series - Kenny Tudrick w/ Steve Nawara 8pm FREE - Variety Lights (mem. Mercury Rev) / Fuxa / The Crooks $10 10pm
Sunday, August 26, 2012 at 9pm

A decade in the making, Füxa - comprising Randall Nieman, alongside Tom Meade and special guests - returns with nine songs of supercharged seasonal splendour. Electric Sound of Summer is perhaps Nieman's most cohesive record yet, in that the ever-present swirling synthesisers and uplifting melodies have been perfectly blended to form a new kind of pop music. It is at once heart-warming and goosebump-inducing - an album of stirring contrasts. Sophisticated guitar and piano lines share the sonic canvas with childlike, playful electronic experiments, evoking a spirit of both sun-blind optimism and wistful tranquillity.

The album is notable for a trio of inspired cover versions. On Daniel Johnston's 'Some Things Last a Long Time', Britta Phillips' (Luna, Dean and Britta) sumptuous vocals retain all the fragility and poignancy of the original, like an ice maiden slowly melting in a heat-wave. Elsewhere, Sarah Peacock (Seefeel, Scala) lends an eerie, claustrophobic air to 'Our Lips are Sealed', turning the GoGo's/Fun Boy Three smash hit into a dark, menacing ode to secrecy and jealousy. The reverse effect is achieved on Füxa's version of Suicide's 'Cheree', whereby Nieman transforms the sparse, sensuous classic into an altogether more uplifting, hair-raising anthem, bubbling with dynamic, stomping drum patterns and Dean Wareham's (Galaxie 500, Luna) reverb-rich vocals. Alongside the album's ecstatic track 'Marty Suicide', 'Cheree' is the ultimate tribute to those torchbearers of synth-laden, sinister lullabies, Alan Vega and Martin Rev, with whom Nieman has collaborated in the past.

While the cover versions act as a centre piece of sorts - a Day Glo triptych showcasing the versatility of Nieman's particular brand of pop - the instrumental pieces indulge the listener in their own arresting melodies, from the feelgood waltz 'I Love You' to the plaintive, piano-led 'Thank You Jesus'. The variety on this album is a testament to both Nieman and his guests' distinct talents. Other collaborators on Electric Sound of Summer include Mark Refoy (Spiritualized/Slipstream), Richard Formby (legendary producer, formerly of Spectrum), Stephen Lawrie (Telescopes), Willie B. Carruthers (Spacemen 3/Spiritualized/freelovebabies), Jerry Hope (the dust collectors) and Kyle Chunco (Saturn Batterie). The artwork is courtesy of the inimitable Anthony Ausgang: a fluid, cartoon-like composition which perfectly primes the listener for the playful delights within.

It is the cross-pollination of these collaborators' talents which gives Electric Sound of Summer its strength and bottomless depth. It is a celebration of creativity; of community; of music past, present... and Füxa.

http://www.fuxamusic.com/

More than 18 years since he left the public spotlight, mysterious mad-genius David Baker, legendary frontman of the original incarnation of Mercury Rev, is back with new band Variety Lights. The masterful new album 'Central Flow', due for release in June, is a collaboration between Baker and fellow vintage synth addict Will MacLean and demonstrates that Baker has lost none of his flair for the extraordinary, the experimental and the exceptional.

As co-founder and vocalist of Mercury Rev, Baker helped to forge their revolutionary sound with their first two (and most critically acclaimed) albums; 'Yerself Is Steam' (1991) and 'Boces' (1993). The band were highly innovative and weren't afraid to experiment but above all they were loud, fun and hugely influential. In the UK, the critics embraced enthusiastically, as Chris Roberts in Melody Maker said (in his review of 'Yerself Is Steam'): "At last, one of those rare records that revolve along once in a blooming moon and have something new to struggle to say... A daring, brazen, and demented juxtaposition of voice and guitars and timpani flings Mercury Rev, lemming like at your more responsive caches of fear."

Having left the band in 1993, Baker went on to release a solo album 'World' under the moniker Shady, which featured members of the Boo Radleys, Rollerskate Skinny, Swervedriver and Th' Faith Healers. At times soaringly catchy and lightheartedly loony, 'World' is a sonic adventure which Vox described as "... awash with fragments of dense noise, stumbling, narcotic-laced tempos and lyrics from outer space... that mutate into spiky, bittersweet pop."

Although there has been much speculation about his life during his time away from the public eye, Baker has continued to make recordings and is an avid music fan, working as a producer for various artists. Now he is back, morphed and transmogrified into Variety Lights (a name lifted from Fellini's first film).

When he met Will MacLean, Baker found a songwriting partner who shared a passion for analogue synths and electronic psychedelia. Initial experimentation together live to tape - to see how big and crazy just the two of them could sound - started to reveal melodies and Variety Lights was born.

Much of Variety Lights' debut was recorded by Baker at his own Over the Trees studio. The sound was created using a mixture of chained around-the-room 80's era midi expanders as well as the duo's collection of vintage keyboards and combining them with an array of drum machines and effected guitars.

In creating 'Central Flow's sound, Baker says that "personal adventure is and always has been the most important thing". Baker and MacLean found themselves using references to colours, pictures and describing film scenes to help them communicate about their music. As in his early work, Baker took a richly layered approach, using multiple vocals in a search to find emotion in noises and sounds. 

abortion pill online purchase http://www.peoplearenotforsale.com/template/default.aspx?where-to-buy-abortion-pill-online where to buy abortion pills online



About | Calendar | Pj’s Blog | Kitchen | Booking | Location | Contact
© 2010 Grootka Inc. All Rights Reserved.